Info

Tiny Spark

We investigate philanthropy, nonprofits and for-profit social good initiatives. In-depth interviews and shoe leather reporting from across the globe. Send us your tips. www.tinyspark.org
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
Tiny Spark
2020
July
June
May
April
March


2019
December
November
October
September
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
May
April


2017
December
October
September
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2014
December
November
August
July
May
April
January


2013
September
August
January


2012
October
August


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: January, 2015
Jan 20, 2015
Carrboro High School in Carrboro North Carolina is an unlikely meeting place for leaders from the world of international aid and development. But over the years, global studies teacher Matt Cone has given his students face time with an impressive list of guests: from former USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah to Nobel Peace Prize winning economist Mohammed Yunus to First Lady Laura Bush. Most meetings between students and guests have taken place by Skype and speaker phone but last year, Cone's students flew to New York to meet with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim. Cone says his students, steeped in issues of economic development and international aid, were "thrilled" to meet Kim, as you can see from this selfie. "I wanted to teach a course where students had access to people who were trying to make a difference in the world," Cone said. "And I thought that if they got something that was different from a fairytale version they might actually become interested in being engaged citizens." It seems to be working. Carrboro students have gone on to work in rural Africa; another, inspired by the work of Paul Farmer, is now pursuing a career in global medicine; a couple more headed off to the Peace Corps. Cone says he feels good about the world when he’s with his students. "I feel like they're going to push this thing forward far more than my generation did."
Jan 6, 2015
“It's confounding for doctors, for me, when you see that your idea of how a patient is doing is completely wrong, and deadly wrong,” says physician Joel Selanikio about his time treating Ebola patients in Lunsar, Sierra Leone. Looking to the future, he is optimistic about bringing down Ebola in West Africa but remains concerned about the bigger picture in the developing world – the broken systems such as government and healthcare. He describes his experiences with Tiny Spark.
1